Police and Pediatrics

As many of you know, I took a 6-month hiatus from my blog last year to write and edit a piece on policing and pediatrics. I am excited to finally share my work entitled Police, Equity, and Child Health, that was published in Pediatrics this month! AND because this is a topic of public interest and concern, I’m also excited to announce the journal has agreed to allow free access to the piece online for the entire month of February! Check out the pdf version here and feel free to share your comments below. I can’t wait to hear what you all think!

For me, this issue is personal and writing and defending this piece for the past 6 months has been incredibly emotional. But it has also been one of the most rewarding experiences of my early career and I only hope to continue to push myself and my field to consider and engage issues that uniquely and disproportionately affect the health and well-being of children and people of color. To use a line from Black Lives Matters co-founder, Alicia Garza, at its best, this piece is a love letter, and I hope those who read it feel my deep love for my people and my people feel loved and cared for by me, and by proxy, by my profession.

I also want to publicly acknowledge and thank my mother, Avis Boyd, who reviewed every word, every line, and every intention of this piece. She is the backbone that kept this piece afloat when biting critique wore at my resolve. For this and everything, she is everything.

Last year, when Walter Scott died, I pleaded in exasperation, for my colleagues and my field to consider his death and the death of other young black folks an affront to our professional commitment to promote health. But it wasn’t enough. And although these words were powerful for me to write, they will not be enough either.

So I’ve also drafted a resolution to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Annual Leadership Forum taking place this March, where the academy sets the agenda for child health for the coming year. The resolution is #71 The Impact of Adverse Police Exposures on Child Health and it urges the academy to both advocate for community and school policing policies that place children’s health first and to research and fully articulate the disproportionate impact children of color face from adverse police exposures.

If you are a pediatrician or a student member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, click here, to comment on and support this resolution, bringing the issue of policing and pediatrics across the country and helping the academy take an important step to better serve children and families of color.

If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area and are interested in joining a local coalition seeking to understand and address how police practices and policies can protect, promote, or harm health in our community, leave a comment and I’ll add you to our email list.

Happy Black Futures Month!

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