What an Oreo can Ad to Medicine

OreoHow do you prepare for something that doesn’t exist?

In medicine, what tools will be required to build a better future for providers, patients, and the many advocates who work to make health realized?

Like our predecessors before us, embracing an unknown future will likely require solutions that are part rigorous methodology and part instinctual art. I am confident that the rigorous methodology that makes science unique among fields of scholarship will continue to advance discovery in health and disease management. But how can modern-day physicians and health advocates use the art of our practice to increase health literacy, connect the dots between health and society, and optimize our relationships with complementary fields?

When I saw the Oreo Super Bowl ad, I knew. This is what medicine should be doing. Not pushing sugar sweetened products, but utilizing moments to capture national attention around a singular idea – health.

For those of us interested in the exciting opportunities new technology offers the field of medicine, Oreo taught us that capturing national attention may be as simple as fostering thoughtful application of new media; media that for all said purposes, is free (although the thoughtful application part definitely requires a significant investment…more on that in future posts).

It is clear that consumers are now making decisions in the context of an online network of peers where they collectively share cultural experiences and discuss trending topics in news and popular media. This is an incredible opportunity to key into consumers who are looking for health information, information that data suggests some are using to make health decisions. Interacting with patients on their timetable, moderated by their thoughts and comments, and based on their personal priorities, allows medicine to have a greater impact beyond the confines of our offices and medical centers. And I’m not just talking about e-visits (although this is an interesting and potentially great idea), I’m talking about engaging a national audience in a conversation about health, identifying partners in this work, and aligning all of our interests to reach a common goal – health.

Part of preparation for any unknown outcome is recognizing opportunities to take steps in the right direction. New technology, like that promoted by incubators like Rock Health and thought leaders like Wendy Sue Swanson, MD and Bryan Vartabedian, MD, will definitely define the future of our field; a future that I hope is rooted in simplicity, transparency, and good old customer service.

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